Posts Tagged ‘ august ’

Fynbos and friends

Posted on: July 29th, 2022 by Loyiso Mamahlodi No Comments

Boost your garden’s biodiversity by growing fynbos, anywhere in South Africa!

icas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

For more tips on growing fynbos, hit the link: https://www.lifeisagarden.co.za/fynbos-and-friends-industry-expert/

 

 

Pressed Proteas Fynbos DIY

Posted on: July 27th, 2022 by Loyiso Mamahlodi No Comments
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

With so much flamboyant fynbos in the air, Life is a Garden has found a way for you to preserve this beauty forever. Pressed botanical collages are a timeless, elegant way to showcase your homegrown glory. Frame your stylish creations and hang them up in your home or office as organic art masterpieces for all to admire 

august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

You will need:  

  • Frames with glass: You could use multiple smaller frames or go for one large artwork. Consider a sleek white or deep purple frame to compliment the more pastel colours of the preserved flowers.  
  • Backboard: This is what you will use to create your collage on. You can find thick cardboard in a variety of colours at your local stationery shop. Once again, a plain white or deep purple would work well for an overall sleek look, whereas bright greens or blue cardboard would give it more of a stylised feel.  
  • Clear-drying craft glue: Once all your plant pieces have dried, the glue will be used to stick them onto the cardboard sheet.  
  • Paper towels or fabric: These materials will be used on both sides of your flowers during pressing for protection and moisture abortion.  
  • Pressing materials: These could be big books or slabs of wood or bricks. Anything heavy will work well, provided you protect both sides of your flowers with a paper towel or fabric.  
  • Flowers: Fynbos works particularly well as their colour holds nicely and the added texture creates a more 3D look. Our top flower picks for pressing are:  
  • All fynbos and protea varieties 
  • Peony, roses, heliobore, Queen Anne’s lace, astilbe, seeded eucalyptus, dahlias, ranunculus, lavender, as well as peonies, roses, ranunculus, and hydrangea.  

Top flower tip: Avoid using anthurium, orchids, lilies, plumeria, and succulents as they hold a lot of excess moisture, which makes them very challenging to preserve properly. Once pressed, white flowers will turn to a more winter white, so keep this in mind when selecting colours. Go for richly coloured blooms that will turn out in even deeper shades once preserved.  

vaugust, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

Method: 

  1. The most important part of capturing the full shape and dimension of your protea is actually to press the parts individually. Once dried, you will be able to reconstruct your centrepiece flower to better mimic its original glorious form. As such, begin your pressing process by carefully taking apart the major elements of your protea. Other smaller flowers and foliage can be left as is, but it is nice to also have individually pressed leaves for later detailing and texture.  
  2. Once you have all the pieces of your protea and accompanying flowers, prepare your chosen pressing environment by placing your paper towel or fabric on the bottom surface. Place all your plants on the paper towel or fabric and then place another layer of material over them. 
  3. Place the top part of your chosen pressing slab/brick/book on top of your arrangement and allow it to completely dry for 3 to 4 weeks.  

Top tip: To test if your plants have dried enough, see if they crack when you try to bend them. It’s a good idea to include some extra test pieces during the pressing process to use as your sacrificial plants. This will help you determine if your arrangement has dried properly.   

 

august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

4. Remove all your plant pieces and begin planning your bouquet on the cardboard. You can really get creative here and use anything from calligraphy pens to ribbon and other craft paper to accentuate and personalise your design to suit your décor style.  

5. Once you are happy with the design, apply a small amount of glue to the back of the plant pieces and watch as your organic masterpiece comes to life.  

6. Place the cardboard back into the frame and secure the glass. Your botanical artwork is now ready for the wall!   

august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

Head down to your GCA Garden Centre for a selection of truly flamboyant fynbos to add to your garden. Indigenous plants are always a win for the ecosystem as they home and feed our local wildlife and are naturally suited to our climate. Remember to check which fynbos is particularly suited to your area and grab a bag of fertiliser to boost their growth after transplanting.  

Fynbos and Friends Botanical Boss

Posted on: July 26th, 2022 by Loyiso Mamahlodi No Comments

Did you know? Fynbos is not only reserved for botanical gardeners and coastal landscapes – you can grow our indigenous glory from your backyard, anywhere in SA! Life is a Garden sat down with industry experts to get the full scoop on how to successfully grow fynbos in both summer and winter rainfall regions. Hold on to your hats, we’re about to go on a fynbos frenzy!  

 

How fresh is your fynbos knowledge?  

The word fynbos comes from Old Dutch meaning ‘fine bush’. The word does not only refer to one plant but rather a specific group of vegetation that is known as Proteaceae. Fynbos also includes restio, pelargoniums, vygies, bulbs and selected annuals. Think of using the term fynbos much like we would say savanna or tropical forest.  

For generations, scientists (including Charles Darwin) have been fascinated by this incredible plant species. Over millions of years, fynbos has expertly adapted to some of the harshest landscapes around Africa, resulting in the world’s most diverse plant habitat, even more than a tropical rainforest! The amazement doesn’t stop there, did you know that:  

  • There are more plant species on the 70-kilometre-long Cape Peninsula than in the whole of the British Isles. 
  • Table Mountain alone hosts as many plant species as the whole of the UK. 
  • The Western Cape is more botanically diverse than the richest tropical rainforest in South America (including the Amazon).  
  • Fire is essential for fynbos and needed to complete their life cycle (with frequency of the fire being a crucial component). The accumulated dead plant matter replenishes the soil while the intense heat triggers underground bulb growth.  
  • Fynbos-covered mountains are responsible for delivering 1/5 glasses of water in SA. Some of our country's wettest places are wild, soggy mountain tops covered in essential, gorgeous, rare proteas. Fynbos allows up to 80% of the rainwater to run off and fill our rivers and reservoirs. 
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

The call of our country  

If fynbos is so abundant, why should you then grow your own? Sadly, 1 700 fynbos plants are threatened by extinction with a large number also in danger of dying out completely, which is why the Kogelberg Nature Reserve is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the following protected areas, grouped under the Cape Floral Kingdom: 

  • Table Mountain 
  • De Hoop Nature Reserve 
  • Boland mountain complex 
  • Groot Winterhoek wilderness area 
  • Swartberg mountains 
  • Boosmansbos wilderness area 
  • Cederberg wilderness area 
  • Baviaanskloof 
  • Kirstenbosch Botanical Garden 

The threat to fynbos is not particularly climate change but alien trees. Mediterranean pines, Australian eucalypts and acacias thrive in similar environments and gradually overwhelm our fynbos, transforming landscapes into dark forests.  

You can answer the call of our country and make a difference in your own garden by: 

  • planting fynbos 
  • removing alien trees 
  • investing in a rainwater tank 
  • using biologically friendly pesticides  
  • providing shelter, food, and water for wildlife   

 

august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

Time to get fynbos-fantastic!  

Now that we’re well-educated and inspired, it’s time to get to the juicy part of our adventure – starting a fynbos bed! With over 650 Erica species, 330 proteas, 320 restio varieties, and 137 phylicas – it’s pure paradise for gardeners (although also a tad overwhelming in terms of choice). It is important to plant fynbos according to your region’s rainfall (do you get rain during winter or summer?). This distinction, along with the following top plant picks from our experts, will help you decide on which plants to grow and how to design a glamorous indigenous bed with fynbos.   

Top tip: Fynbos loves organic, rich dirt and thrive in sandstone derived, acidic soil with good drainage, moderate watering, and no manure.    

 

Best bets for summer rain regions  

  1. King protea – is our national flower and available in pinks, reds, and whites.  
  2. Protea ‘Sylvia’ – cold hardy up to -7°C, could flower any time of the year when mature. 
  3. Phylica pubecens ‘Veerkoppie’ – is a texture delight and something different. 
  4. Erica versicolor ‘Sunbird red, pink and white’ – is a sunbird favourite and flowers almost the whole year-round. 
  5. Leucadendron ‘Safari Sunset’ – is an easy growing conebush with beautiful red foliage. 

Designer fynbos beds (summer rain)  

Plant Safari Sunset, protea ‘Sylvia’, Sugardaddy, and Brunia for your high points (2-3m) at the backs of beds. King protea, phylica, Erica, pincussion, and mimetes work well as medium plants (1-1.5m) while vygies will work well as smaller plants for the fronts of beds (border plants).  

Summer rain growing hacks  

Proteas are best planted out immediately after the frost period has passed (in August and September) while the air is still cool. Proteas like to be planted in groups providing mutual support during strong winds. Keep the soil cool with mulch such as pine needles that will add to the acidity of your soil. 

 

august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

Best bets for winter rain regions  

  1. Leucadendron Harlequin – is perfect as a low-growing, bright hedge/shrub.
  2. Protea Little Prince – is a dwarfed stunner, ideal for smaller gardens.
  3. Leucospermum High Gold – is a flashy yellow shrub for the patio and beds.
  4. Aulux Bronze Haze - blossoms in summer and turns a deep bronze in winter.
  5. Agathosmas (Buchu) – a super medicinal plant, great for tees, and low maintenance.

  

Designer fynbos beds (winter rain)  

Plant Leucadendron Safari Sunset and Burgundy Sunset at the back of beds (2-3m). Bring in Leucospermum Ayoba Pink, Calypso Red and Ayoba Red for a middle burst of colour (1-1.5m). Filler plants such as Erica abietina, sparmanii, and cerinthoides will bring it all together perfectly.  

 

Winter rain growing hacks  

Proteas are best planted out into beds and permanent containers in autumn (April and May). Before planting, the chosen site should be cleared of all growth and individual holes (at least 40cm deep) prepared for each plant. At planting, do not add any bone meal or other forms of phosphorous or compost to the planting hole.  

 

Did you know? Proteas are social plants growing in close-knit communities that help to protect one another from harsh climates and wind.  

august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

Friends of fynbos to look forward to  

Colourful sunbirds in masses, bees lured in by lekker local pollen, and cute rhino beetles that love a good compost heap – just some of the garden visitors to get excited about. Planting a variety of different fynbos will attract a multitude of incredible natural predators that all help keep your garden’s ecosystem and food chain intact and balanced. Your secret weapon with pest control is Mother Nature – if you plant it, the good guys will come!  

 

Top tip: Mulch your plants with acid compost once a year and remember to prune your fynbos after flowering or before spring for nice full growth.  

 

Best fynbos for containers  

Leucospermums: Ayoba Red, Ayoba Pink, Calypso Red, and Sweet Lucy 

Proteas: Little Prince and Roupe 

Leucadendrons: Senorita, Red Devil, Harvest, Harlequin, and Amy 

Ericas: Abietina, Fairy Bells, Cerenthoides, Sparmanii, and Serruiras (Blushing Brides) 

august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

Fynbos secrets for success  

Our experts have shared the following advice to help you grow fabulous fynbos successfully.  

  • Always plant your fynbos in full sun. Most varieties, especially Leucospermum, will not flower otherwise.  
  • Fynbos in winter rainfall areas require excellent air circulation, cool nights, and low humidity in summer. 
  • Fynbos will not survive in heavy clay soils. In such conditions, plant on slopes or create soil mounds into which acid compost has been thoroughly mixed.  
  • Proteaceae take about 18 months to establish during which time they need regular deep watering according to your region’s rainfall.  
  • Always sterilise your secateurs and sheers, especially when cutting a sick plant as this will spread disease to the other plants.  
  • Proteas like cool soil, so plant these groundcovers around their stems: Dymondia, margareteae, Othonna capensis, and Carpobrotus edulis.  
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

With so much insight, your fynbos growing journey is sure to be simple and splendid. Remember to visit your GCA Garden Centre when you can find a collection of fynbos to adopt. Enjoy answering the call of our country and connecting with our wildlife like never before. Life is a Garden, let’s fill it with fantastic fynbos!  

Fynbos on the patio for winter rain regions Industry Expert Q&A

Posted on: July 26th, 2022 by Loyiso Mamahlodi No Comments
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

Topic: Fynbos and friends
Theme: Biodiversity and fynbos beds/containers for winter rainfall regions
Industry Expert Garden Centre: Arnelia Nurseries - https://arnelia.co.za/  

 

If you are a gardener living in a winter rainfall region – this Q and A with Arnelia Nurseries is your next must-read. Learn how to perfect your fynbos beds, utilise natural predators for pest control,  successfully grow in containers, and find out which top plants are suited for your area.

1.Out of all our stunning South African plants, what makes fynbos stand out for you?  

 Fynbos generally is adaptable and with an understanding and appreciation of the basic growing requirements, one is assured of success and a great deal of pleasure.  The variation in colours, foliage, heights, and the potential use of so many different varieties make fynbos in the garden a must-have.   

august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

2. We love the fact that your nursery specialises in Proteaceae varieties. Could you please tell us about the biodiversity benefits of growing these indigenous plants? What kind of wildlife visitors do you get the most of on your farm?  

The Cape Floristic region is one of the most biodiverse regions in the world and Proteaceae are the flagship of the Cape Flora. I think getting people to grow these indigenous plants in their gardens allows them to bring a piece of the famous Cape Flora home and hopefully create more awareness of the wonderful biodiversity that exists on our doorstep. Beyond creating awareness, planting fynbos has the benefit of attracting indigenous wildlife. On our farm, we have a lot of sunbirds as there is always something in flower to keep them interested. It is really special to see. Growing these plants in the city creates a space for all the animals, birds and insects to flourish where they would usually have no habitat and stay hidden. Fynbos helps to conserve and maintain our amazing biodiversity.   

 

3. To sustainably protect our wildlife, do you have any eco-friendly pest control suggestions for gardeners looking to begin a fynbos growing journey and are there any specific pests they should be looking out for?  

Usually, having a garden with a large variety of different indigenous plants attracts a wide range of birds and insects to your garden. Having a wide range of insects and birds usually brings with it natural predators that will help control the pests in your garden. So, the best pest control advice is to let nature sort itself out. The biggest pest and disease issue with fynbos plants is probably root rot diseases. These are generally quite widespread in soils. Unfortunately, there is no cure for root rot diseases so it usually doesn’t help dumping a whole lot of fungicide into the soil, hoping to cure a sick plant. Often root rot issues are more a problem where people tend to overwater their plants or in areas where the soil does not drain well. So generally, not overwatering a plant will create a plant that is much tougher and resistant to other pest and disease issues. 

 

august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

4. As your nursery is based on the West Coast, which receives winter rain, could you please recommend your top five fynbos varieties to grow in beds and what makes them stand out plants for you?   

Fynbos is very diverse and has so much to offer in foliage, colour, texture, flowers, and even fragrant foliage.  If you plan your garden correctly, you can attract a variety of wildlife, have colour straight through the year and a waterwise garden all in one.  There are so many varieties to name because they all have their special attributes to offer. 

Some of our favourite varieties in no specific order: 

Leucadendron Harlequin 

Protea Little Prince 

Leucospermum High Gold 

Aulux Bronze Haze 

Agathosmas (Buchu) 

august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

5. If you had to design a glamour-inspired fynbos bed for beginner gardeners (in winter rainfall areas), which plants would you suggest and how would you arrange them? Are there any specific growing hacks to support the success of such a bed? 

Taking into account how much space you have available:  

Back:  Leucadendron Safari Sunset and Burgundy Sunset. 

Middle: Leucospermum Ayoba Pink, Calypso Red and Ayoba Red.  

Filler plants:  Erica abietina, sparmanii, cerinthoides  

Scented plants: Agathosma cilliaris and apiculata or Leucospermum Sweet Lucy 

Groundcover:  Leucospermum Hullabaloo 

 

In winter rainfall areas, proteas are best planted out into the garden and into permanent containers in autumn (April and May), once cool, moist weather has definitely set in. Before planting, the chosen site should be cleared of all growth and individual holes (at least 40cm deep) prepared for each plant. At planting, don’t add any bone meal or other forms of phosphorous or compost to the planting hole. Any organic material with high levels of phosphorous or a high pH should be avoided 

The recommended planting distance is 0.65m for species that attain a maximum height of 2m and those exceeding 2m are planted at a distance of 1m. Smaller species, such as Agathosma and Serruria can be planted 0.5m apart. After removal from the pot, be sure to place the plant at the same level it was in the container and disturb the roots as little as possible. Firm the soil around each plant and water well.  

In summer rainfall areas, proteas are best planted out immediately after the frost period has passed (in August and September) while the air is still cool. Proteas like to be planted in groups providing mutual support during strong winds. Keep the soil cool with mulch such as pine needles that will add to the acidity of your soil. 

august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

6. Are there any advantages of growing a fynbos specific bed? What would be a motivator to inspire gardeners to start one?  

Members of the protea family are essentially social plants, although there are some exceptions. Many of the species growing in their natural habitat occur in close proximity to one another, forming close-knit communities. The individual plants protect one another from prevailing winds and form a dense cover that prevents compaction, keeps the soil cool, and reduces the rate of evaporation. In cultivation, growing Proteaceae in association with other fynbos plants such as buchus, ericas, phylicas and restios, creates a pleasing effect and lengthens the life of plants. Most fynbos plants are relatively short-lived in cultivation and have to be replaced from time to time.  Proteaceae have the same watering needs, soil requirements and general care so would be best to keep them all together. 

august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

7. Are there any fynbos and protea varieties that are particularly suited for container growing? Do you have any advice for patio planting to share?  

Yes, there are many varieties that do well as container plants.  Things to remember are that the plants are not able to look for their own water or food.  Always choose a container that will be big enough for the plant when it is fully grown.  Always cut the plants back after flowering to keep them short, compact, and disease-free. This will also promote flowers for the next season.  Before planting make sure the container is in the correct spot as it might be troublesome to move afterwards. 

Arnelia’s favourite container plants per Genus:
Leucospermums: Ayoba Red, Ayoba Pink, Calypso Red, and Sweet Lucy 

Proteas: Little Prince and Roupe 

Leucadendrons: Senorita, Red Devil, Harvest, Harlequin, and Amy 

Ericas: Abietina, Fairy Bells, Cerenthoides, Sparmanii, and Serruiras (Blushing Brides)

august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

8. Are there any other general handy hacks and maintenance practices you could share with our gardeners?  

It is important to plant your fynbos in full sun. It is well-known that especially Leucospermum fails to flower if planted in complete shade. Those from the winter rainfall area require excellent air circulation and cool nights and cannot tolerate high humidity in summer. 

A soil with more than 30% clay in the top-and sub-soil is not recommended for the planting of most Proteaceae even though species of Proteaceae also grow on Bokkeveld shale, which has a high clay content, but generally in cultivation fynbos don’t survive in heavy clay media, and in such conditions, one needs to plant on slopes or create soil mounds into which acid compost has been thoroughly mixed; the addition of gypsum will assist in separating the clay particles.  Remember Proteaceae takes about 18months to establish and in that time need regular deep water depending on the weather more in summer and less in the winter due to the rain. 

When you cut your plants back always make sure you sterilise your secateurs, especially if cutting a plant with a disease as this is how most things spread in the garden. 

august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity
august, fynbos, protea, ericas, king proteas, life is a garden, greenery, colour, plants, diversity

The team from Arnelia Nurseries have certainly spoiled us with so much fynbos wisdom. Head down to your GCA Garden Centre and see which of their plant recommendations are ready to come home with you. While you are there, check out the birdbaths and critter houses for sale in preparation for your wildlife visitors. You can also access our GCA Garden Centre locator here: https://www.lifeisagarden.co.za/category/garden-centres/  

LIAG Press Clippings – August 2021

Posted on: September 6th, 2021 by Cassidy No Comments

Life is a Garden received press coverage to the amount of R 251,226.77 in the month of August. The below spreadsheet shows the total press coverage that Life is a Garden received in the month of August 2021.

To view the Life is a Garden – August “Redbook” actual press clippings, please click here: https://bit.ly/2WXArqU

 

Press Report of August

 

 

 

Marketing Snapshot

 

 

 

 

Spring Zing September Checklist

Posted on: August 24th, 2021 by Cassidy No Comments
The season that needs no introduction – it can only be SPRING! This is an exciting time for gardeners filled with blossoms, blooms, and renewed beauty after the winter.
We’re full bloom ahead with ‘n spekkie news for you! for more read here: https://bit.ly/3guOLOi

September Checklist

Garden Day 2021

Posted on: August 16th, 2021 by Cassidy No Comments

Host your own Garden Day celebration on Sunday 17 October. The Garden Day website has put together a handy toolkit of ideas and resources, which you can use to support the campaign via social media, including Instagram, Facebook and WhatsApp.

Download any of the images and share photos of your celebrations using #GardenDaySA #GardenYaySA #LifeIsAGarden

August Checklist

Posted on: July 27th, 2021 by Cassidy No Comments
We’re crazy for daisies and getting the garden ready for a Springtime show.
August is blowing in some extra special blooms in gorgeous hues for every mood for more read here: https://bit.ly/3rD79IZ
August Checklist

August in the Garden Checklist An extraordinary, rewarding August

Posted on: July 13th, 2021 by Cassidy No Comments

With the great winds of change upon us, dare we say the smell of spring approaches! All your hard work this winter will soon pay off as August comes to reward the garden with extraordinary blooms in gorgeous hues for every mood. There’s one more month of cool-season stunners to enjoy with daisy bushes leading the pack. Make sure to tick off your maintenance checklist and begin prepping the lawn for September. Edibles are exciting in August too and there’s much to sow and munch on. Hold onto your hats and let’s glide right in!

 

Fulfilling flowers
Strikingly crazy for daisies

Colour blast your way through the wind and immerse outdoor beds in bold and brave daisy bushes. The vivid variety of daisy blooms will pop off brilliantly against the winter landscape and are simply stand out additions to the  garden. Daisies flourish in containers, beds, and borders that receive full sun. Bushes can be sown and/or planted in autumn for a vibrant August gust of colour. Here are seven striking inspirations:

  1. Cape daisy (Osteospermum): Indigenous and water-wise in deep shades of many magical colours to choose from, flowering from spring to autumn.
  2. Marguerite daisy (Argyranthemum): Blooms attract butterflies, available in pretty coloured hues for every mood that flower from spring to autumn. Single and double flowers available.
  3. English daisy (Bellis perennis): A fast grower and spreader with uniquely rounded red, white, and pink flowers, blooming in masses from winter to spring.
  • Golden daisy bush (Euryops chrysanthemoides): Compact and evergreen with bright golden-yellow blooms peaking from autumn to spring.
  • Livingstone daisy (Mesembryanthemum): Dark centres blend into radiant shades of pinks, purples, orange, yellow, and crimson. Flowering begins in August, peaking in September.
  • Shasta daisy (Leucanthemum): Cheerful and quick-spreading with robust all-white petals and a yellow centre. These lovelies bloom from late spring to autumn.
  • Kingfisher daisy (Felicia amelloides): Local and lively with masses of sky-blue petals and yellow centres.  They attract butterflies and flower from spring to autumn.

 

Daisy do’s: Although performing best during colder climates, daisy bushes will flower repeatedly throughout the year. If you maintain them well with regular watering, feeding, and deadheading, your garden will be rewarded with near-constant colour and frequent surprises popping up.

 

Top tip: Fly over to your GCA Garden Centre and see which crazy daisies are in-store and in bloom now. Don’t forget your compost and organic fertiliser while you're there.

More mad blooms to sow now: It’s wakey-wakey to winter beds with marigolds, cosmos, lobularia, cleomes, godetias, lavateras, phlox, sunflowers, impatiens, and begonia.

Blushing August bulbs to plant now: These summer-flowering bulbs are ready for some rich soil, sun, and water: gladiolus, calla lilies, cannas, spider lilies, George lilies, tuberoses, galtonias, schizostylis, crocosmias, storm lilies, arum lilies, and dahlias.

Top tip: Don’t be tempted to cut off the leaves of your spring bulbs just yet. Although they have finished flowering, they need these leaves to make food for the developing bulb.

A rosy reminder: Ensure all roses have been pruned and increase watering. Spray bare stems to kill insect eggs and fungus spores. Relocation and transplanting should also be done now, followed by a good feeding. Visit your GCA Garden Centre for rose care essentials.

Marigold
In the grow zone

Edibles for sowing from seed packets

  • In frost-free areas, sow these summer crops now: runner beans, dwarf beans, maize, sweet corn, pumpkins, and squashes.
  • Herbs heralding the spring sunshine: sweet basil, coriander, and rocket.

* Remember to harvest your root veggies: parsnips, turnips, beetroot, carrot, and radish.

 

Edibles for growing from seedlings

  • Plant out rhubarb, shallots, garlic, globe artichokes, tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant.

*Also remember to top-dress perennial crops such as asparagus.

Motivated maintenance

Lawn loving

  • Begin prepping the lawn for spring with lawn dressing, fertiliser, and compost.
  • Your pre-spring treatment includes low mowing, firm raking, leveling out, and covering with lawn dressing.
  • Sow seeds for shade lawn now.

 

Wind whirling

  • The windy month has arrived. Stake all newly planted trees to prevent toppling and breakages.
  • Ensure all creepers are securely supported on trellises and tie-down branches where needed.
  • Mulch around your edibles to prevent wind erosion and help retain warmth.

 

Slug repelling

  • Slugs and snails are eager to feast on soft spring plantings. Go to battle by planting barrier plants around new greens.
  • Barrier plants include mint, garlic, chives, geraniums, and fennel.
  • Goggas are deterred by the pungent smell and taste of these natural pest-repelling plants.

 

Ladybugs to the rescue: Our eco-hero of the month is the sweet little ladybug. She may be pretty, but mealybugs, aphids, scale, caterpillars, and thrips beware of her deadly munching crunch! These pesky critters are her favourite meals and she’ll make quick work of them too.

Some cold caution: In very cold regions, leave pruning of frost-damaged plants until next month as the affected foliage protects the plant in case of another frostbite attack.

Your GCA Garden Centre is ready to receive your August enthusiasm, so head on over to see what grabs you and sparks your inspiration. Have an extraordinarily rewarding last month of winter and well done for keeping your crops and flowers flourishing. Daisies are your best colourful cover-up for gardens that took a little beating in the cool season. Plant some now and blow away the haters! Life is a Garden, just grow with it.

LIAG Press Clippings – August 2020

Posted on: September 1st, 2020 by Shahnee Stockigt No Comments

Life is a Garden received press coverage to the amount of R 1,055,378.05  in the month of July. The below spreadsheet shows the total press coverage that Life is a Garden received in the month of  August 2020.

To view the Life is a Garden – August's “Redbook” actual press clippings, please click here: https://bit.ly/31MCWvV 

 

Press Report of August

 

Marketing Snapshot