Posts Tagged ‘ happy place ’

February in the Garden The garden - your happy place

Posted on: January 23rd, 2020 by Shahnee Stockigt No Comments

February is great for outdoor living and entertaining on our patios, around the pool or braaing and picnicking in our gardens. The end of the month will be a great time to sow Sweet William seed to provide splashes of colour in your happy place. Part of the carnation family, Sweet William, (Dianthus barbatus), bear masses of single flowers that are mostly striped and have pretty, serrated edges, available in pinks, whites, purples, violet and more. Scatter the seeds onto the soil in a sunny spot and water lightly every few days. These biennials have a sweet, peppery perfume and are prized as a cut flower. Their nectar attracts bees, butterflies and birds and they tend to self-seed.

Tip: Start preparing your soil in strips or ridges for the sowing of Sweet Peas in March and April. Don’t forget the trellis or other support framework for them to climb up.

What to Plant

It is a good time to start planning your plantings of winter flowering annuals. Across most of our country cold winter days warm up sufficiently by midday to enjoy a winter braai to compliment the rugby or simply enjoy with friends. Winter and spring flowering annuals provide the colourful WOW factor in your happy place. The nights will start to cool down soon and by March and April you will be able to buy your favourites.

Hold onto your heart, while you get introduced to royalty, the new Petunia “Queen of Hearts” and “King of Hearts”. These two regal gems are set to smitten you with their large flowers bordered by perfectly formed red hearts set in a yellow background, for the Queen, and white background for the King of Hearts. In favourable conditions the flowers often smother the plant…. with their hearts ….. or should we say kisses? Grow them in full sun or partial shade in the garden, pots or hanging baskets.

What to Spray – to protect your happy place

Intense Summer heat combined with the under-watering of certain plants, (like roses), are ideal conditions for Red Spider Mites and Two Spotted Mites to cause damage to your plants. To identify them you will need to look out for white/yellowish spots/patches on their upper leaf surface. These spots multiply and the leaf becomes more yellow with the outer edges of the leaf staying greener. This is an indication of the increase in mites sucking on the underside of the leaves. Later leaves may drop off, and in severe cases, tiny web-like strands can be seen on the plant. Turn the leaf over and by using a magnifying glass you will notice a few, (or many), very tiny adult mites moving around. If in doubt, take a few sample leaves into your local GCA Garden Centre to identify the pest. Make sure that the sample is carefully sealed in a zip-lock bag. Certain recommended oils are best used to spray on the underside of the leaves in order to suffocate the pest and these can be bought at your garden centre. Tip: Do not apply oil sprays in the heat of the day.

Powdery Mildew is a fungal disease that loves hot, wet and windy weather. Affected leaves, stems and even fruit look like they have been powdered. The pathogens may have overwintered in the plant or spread by wind. Tentacles enter the plant to take out nutrients and moisture, but the powdery spreading takes place outside the plant. The disease stresses and weakens the plant and if it covers large areas of the leaves it may also reduce the sugars produced in the plant and thus the flavour of the fruit or vegetable. Here are some of the most common plants that are more susceptible to Powdery Mildew: roses, begonias, dahlias, zinnias, melons, zucchini, squash, grapes, potato plants, peppers and lettuce. Visit your local GCA Garden Centre for a recommended solution.

What to Feed

Give your happy place plants a boost to get them through the Summer. This can be done in several ways, firstly there are the traditional granular/pelleted fertilisers. At this time of year any flowering or fruiting plants will benefit from a balanced fertiliser. Your favourite GCA Garden Centre will have a range on offer for you. Like roses and lots of other flowers they need to keep growing and require nitrogen as well as some phosphates.

Liquid fertilisers are said to be like Red Bull for plants! Yes, like other fertilisers, they can be used to boost the health and nutrition of both indoor and outdoor plants. They are easy to apply either as a soil drench, with some being great as a foliar feed too.

What to Pick – from your happy place

It is almost autumn and that means harvesting season. Growing berries has become quite the thing to do. So, let’s look at some popular berries you can expect to harvest now and in the coming months:

  • Blackberries: Pick when plump and shiny. Rinse the berries just before eating since doing this at the time of picking will encourage them to become soggy.
  • Blueberries: Most varieties have a matt, dull look to them when ripe.
  • Cape Gooseberries (Physalis edulis): (The “Cape” is not a geographical indication but rather the Cape or husk covering the fruit). Plump, fresh-looking gooseberries can be picked as they are starting to change colour. These early berries will be quite hard and very tart but are great for making pies, crumbles and tarts. Once they change colour to an orangey-yellow and you can feel some “give” when gently pressed between your fingers, this indicates that they are fully ripe, much sweeter and ready to eat fresh. If you haven’t started picking and berries start falling off the bushes, then this is your que.

Tip: Removing berries early on thins the berries out and allows the remaining ones to grow larger.

  • Raspberries: They ripen over about a two-week period which means picking every few days. When ripe the berry will leave the vine willingly. If you need to tug on them this means that they are not yet ripe. Try to harvest on sunny days when they are dry and only rinse them just before eating.
  • Gogi berries: You may have to wait a bit longer for these to ripen. Only the ripe berries, (i.e. when fully changed to a red colour and easily removed from the tree), are edible. The berries are easily bruised and turn black if injured during picking. It is best to place a sheet of some kind below the tree while you shake the fruit loose.

Let’s bring a little love into our happy place with “pomme d’amour” the old French word for a tomato (which literally translates to love apple). It is time to harvest tomatoes. Don’t despair if you did not find time to plant any this season because there is an “instant fix” in the form of “patio veg”. This is a range of often smaller growing veg that are ideal for planting in pots on a sunny patio or elsewhere. These include amongst others, tomatoes conveniently on offer almost fully grown in pots and hanging baskets…. just about ready to harvest and enjoy! Some amazing patio veg tomato varieties to look out for are “Sweetie”, “Little Sicily”, Orange Zinger and the weeping “Tumbler”.

Tip: Refrigerating fresh tomatoes spoils the texture and flavour that make up that garden tomato taste, so rather place them in a fruit bowl.

Inland gardening

It’s time to tackle algae in the pond on paving or pathways. Go into your GCA Garden Centre and ask for the correct products for ponds – remember to state whether you have fish or plants in the water since some products are harmful to them. When using algaecides on patios, driveways or pathways in the garden, be careful when using them near plants.

Vertical gardening adds another dimension to gardens, placing an arch to divide garden rooms or to accentuate an entrance or path can be a stunning new addition to the garden. Arches are natural “frames” or windows to a view or focal point in the garden. There are also an abundance of exquisite climbing plants that can further enhance an arch like: Climbing Roses, Yellow Jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens), Star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides), Chinese or Winter jasmine (Jasmine polyanthemum) and Mandevillas, to name a few.

Landscaping on the coast

Successful gardening along the coast is enhanced by improving the soil quality by incorporating humus from a compost heap, worm farm and or Bokashi system. Walls and retaining walls can barrier plants that are not salt-resistant from the salty winds. Halophytes are plants that are adapted to withstand these conditions with their normally thick, succulent-like leaves. Here are some recommendations: Beach bean (Canavalia rosea), Beach pumpkin (Arctotheca populifolia), Cyperus crassipes, Dune spinach (Tetragonia decumbens), Natal sour fig (Carpobrotus dimidiatus), Phylohydrax carnosa, Pig's ears (Cotyledon orbiculata), Trailing gazania (Gazania rigens).

Design and grow your happy place. For more gardening tips and information, visit Gardening trends or join the conversation on our Facebook page.

For the love of gardening Must love gardening

Posted on: January 21st, 2020 by Shahnee Stockigt No Comments

Your garden is your happy place. It provides an escape from the hustle and bustle of a busy life, gives you space to express your creativity and shows appreciation for the time, effort and love you put into it by rewarding you with a luscious landscape. There are so many reasons for you to love your garden this love month, and because gardening is a pure form of love it will bring you happiness in so many ways.

Let your love grow

Gardening teaches us how to nurture little seedlings that are filled with hope and potential, into boastful plants, shrubs and trees. It teaches us to love life in various forms and what you put in is what you get out. Gardening teaches us to be patient and enjoy every moment as we tend to the needs of our newest seedlings through to our established plants that need tending to regularly. Spending time caring for plants helps us to find happiness in the smallest blessings when the first leaf sprouts to the largest blessing of a beautiful, tranquil paradise.

Love is all around

Your garden is living proof of all the love, care and effort you put in.  But it doesn’t have to stop there, you can also bring some of the love and happiness of the outdoors indoors with houseplants. There are so many varieties of indoor plants that will transform your home into a living space and bring with it the added benefit of cleaner air, more oxygen and some decorative charm. Whether you have an empty corner or a bare shelf that needs a little something extra, a plant will add life and colour to any area.

Love you long time

Your garden is your happy place and planting a few beautiful flowers and plants on Valentine’s Day is a gift that just keeps on giving. While digging and planting will provide you with hours of happiness just as a benefit of spending time outdoors, your garden and balcony will show appreciation for your time and efforts with bursts of colour dotted all around the garden followed by a sweet, lingering fragrance that delights your senses.

Get dirty

There are health and emotional benefits of spending time in the garden. When digging in the soil you are exposed to a soil microbe called Mycobacterium vaccae which has been proven to make you happier. According to research studies, this bacterium stimulates serotonin production which gives it a similar effect on the brain as Prozac, but without the negative side effects. So, when you need a little boost, grab your spade and head to the garden for your dose of joy.

For the birds and the bees

The birds singing, bees buzzing and the gentle sound of leaves swishing in the wind are all familiar sounds you’ll hear when you spend time in your garden. While these sounds may conjure up happy thoughts, bird songs, in particular, have been proven to improve our mental and emotional health and make us happier and healthier. If you want to keep your mood elevated, add a birdbath to your garden, place a bird feeder in the tree and sit back and let the cheerful vibes kick in.

In the words of Arthur Smith, “If you want to be happy forever, take up gardening.” We couldn’t agree more. So go to www.lifeisagarden.co.za for your latest gardening inspiration,

Visit your nearest GCA Garden Centre for gardening supplies and get digging this love month.

The garden is my happy place

Posted on: January 21st, 2020 by Shahnee Stockigt No Comments

Don't wait for someone to bring you flowers. Plant your own garden and decorate your soil - Mario Quintana.

Bees or Butterflies - in your happy place

Without bees there would be very few flowers and even fewer fruits and vegetables since they are our superhero pollinators. If you would like to add more yellow flowering plants to your happy place and attract bees at the same time, here are some ideas: Calendulas, Pansies and Iceland Poppies for winter, yellow flowering Hibiscus, yellow flowering Aloes, Marigolds, Golden Rod, (Solidago spp.), Gazanias, Yellow Clivias, Rudbeckia hirta, Portulaca, Nasturiums, Euryops, Arctotis, Bulbinella and Vygies.

Alternately, if you would like to add blue flowering plants to your happy place and attract butterflies at the same time, here are some ideas: Cornflower, Borage, Lobelia, Blue Michaelmas daisies, Delphiniums, Pansies, Buddleia davidii, Agapanthus, Penstemon, Larkspur, Scabiosa, Plumbago, Wild Peach (Kiggelaria Africana), Geraniums, Ribbon bush (Hypoetes aristata) and Duranta “Sapphire Showers”.

Bedding besties

Pentas (Pentas lanceolata), has large clusters of gorgeous, dainty star-like flowers that bloom almost all summer long and attract bees, butterflies and sun birds. Pentas are medium sized semi-hardy shrubs that grow to about 2m in frost free regions and around 1m in areas or moderate frost. They are equally well suited to being planted in a garden bed or in pots. The flowers range in colour from lavender to red, pink or white. Plant this lovely shrub in full sun and in moist, well-drained soil.

Tip: Remove spent blooms to encourage further flowering.

Blooming babes

Barberton daisies (Gerbera jamesonii), have showy flowers in the most beautiful, eye-catching colours. They make for fabulous indoor plants and are exquisite gifts for Valentine’s day or any other occasion. Tip: water around the edge of the pot and not close to the stem.

Rose care

Deadhead blooms i.e. remove the faded flowers and disbud Hybrid Tea roses by removing side buds so that the remaining bud/s grow larger and stronger. Water up to 3 times a week in the heat. Fertilise your roses and spray with the recommended products fortnightly against black spot, beetles and bollworm.

Water gardens – in your happy place

Dress up your pond or water-feature by placing plants in the water or in a wet (bog) garden alongside it. One of the showiest water plants is our own indigenous arum lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica), with its large leaves and large, striking, bold white blooms. Most garden centres will have a variety of water-loving plants – here are a few favourites to look out for: Acorus gramineus ‘Variegatus’, Cyperus marginatus, Cyperus papyrus ‘Nana’, Phalaris arundinacea, Juncus tenuis ‘Blue Dart’ and for larger water-features Cyperus papyrus.

Try and harvest rainwater during the rainy season. Direct pipes extended from house gutters not already attached to storage tanks, directly into swimming pools and ponds when they require refills.

Gardening is a passion that feeds more than just my soul. For more gardening tips and information, visit Gardening trends or join the conversation on our Facebook page.