What to plant this month

Gazania Family

‘Treasure Flowers’ – Gazania Family

The Gazania family is yet another of South Africa’s indigenous gems that provide unbeatable colour. They are known as ‘Botterblomme’ in Afrikaans and are often referred to as ‘Treasure Flowers’ in English.
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Abelia ‘Francis Mason’

Abelia ‘Frances Mason’ – Lovely foliage plant, with bright golden foliage, such a versitile plant, suited to any garden, sun, hardy, containers, beds, topiary or box hedges.
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Abelia Francis Mason Patio

Abelia Francis Mason Patio Standard

Masses of small and long lasting, white, trumpet-shaped flowers appear on the branches in summer. Hardy and ideal for growing hedges.
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Abelia x grandiflora Kaleidoscope

The new variegated growth emerges bright yellow with a light green center throughout spring gradually turning to golden yellow with a deep green center into the summer months.  
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Agapanthus

Perennial garden hybrid
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Agapanthus praecox ‘Zambezi’

The word Agapanthus is interestingly derived from the Greek words ‘agapѐ’ meaning love and anthos meaning flower. Agapanthus ‘Zambezi’ brings a whole new dimension to these ‘love flowers’ with their striking broad variegated leaves and violet flower heads.
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Aloe arborescens

  Aloe arborescens is a hardy, easy to grow garden shrub. It has exquisite bright flower heads in bright orange or lime yellow which are borne in profusion during the colder months of June and July.
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Aloe Porcupine

A very attractive compact aloe that is fast growing to 25CM X 25CM tall, and spreads outwards from basal suckers. It has upright, medium green colored leaves that have lighter colored soft teeth and mostly unbranched inflorescences bearing striking large bi-colored flowers that are deep rose pink in bud opening to a greenish cream color from the bottom of the inflorescence upwards, with flowering beginning in late summer and extending into mid-winter with a peak in autumn.
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Angelonia angustifolia Waterfall Mix

Angelonia or summer snap dragons are perfect for hot summer gardens. Their cool and refreshing colours range from lilac to purple and then to white.
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Anthurium Andreanum

  Put in a little and get back a lot! Light: Medium: Soil can dry out moderately between watering. Watering:  DO NOT OVER WATER.
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Arctotis Red Radiance

  Arctotis or African Daisy is a proudly South African variety of ground cover. It provides large and colourful daisy-like flowers that range from pink to red, yellow and burnt orange…..  
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Argyranthemum Madeira

Argyranthemum are without doubt one of the all time classic garden favourites! With a wide variety of colours and cultivars available, there is without doubt, a variety to suit each individual preference in almost all sunny locations.
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Azalea Alba Magnifica (Rhododendron indica)

Perennial, vigorous shrub
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Azalea Magenta (Rhododendron Magenta)

Spring bloomer
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Azalea Mixed Colours

A variety of colours, double and single blooms
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Bacopa

This brave little groundcover can withstand the hot dry summers and keeps giving flowers for most of the year. They like well-drained soil and minimal water to give the gardener joy.
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Banana ‘Williams’

The cultivar ‘Williams’, is a slightly taller species of banana. It has excellent large bunching characteristics and long fruit fingers, measuring approximately 20cm.
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Braai Rosemary

Barbeque Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Barbecue’)

Barbeque Rosemary is a “must have” evergreen for any South African garden! It is a fast growing herb, with aromatic, spiky dark green leaves and has strong, straight stems, It is a culinary and medicinal herb that has a good flavour, making it perfect for barbeque skewers! 
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Basil: Columnar

Ocimum basilicum var. (Columnar Basil) is also known as Greek Basil. Columnar Basil is a perennial plant that is strongly aromatic and is classified as a herb.
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Begonia Dragon Wings

Full sun / semi shade perennial. Grows to 50cm. Masses of pink or red flowers throughout the year but more prolific in spring and summer.
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